Albert Rukwaro
Special To The Gardner News
Gardner city council members said they were unhappy with the way several planning commission members conducted themselves during a recent public hearing on a proposed mix-use development.
Council members said during a March 18 council meeting that some commissioners were not courteous and civil to homeowners who appeared before the commission to protest the placement of a pool and clubhouse near their townhomes.
“I suggest that the planning commission receive training on etiquette and civility,” said Randy Gregorcyck, councilmember. “We missed the opportunity at the planning commission level , and I urge the mayor to work with staff and the commission on training.”
Rich Melton, council vice president, said he supports calls for more training for planning commissioners “because there are folks over there who don’t know their role.”
Lee Moore, council president, said he did not like the behavior of some of the commissioners. “There is no reason to treat a member of public in that way.”
Moore ,however ,commended staff members who he said did a phenomenal job through that ordeal.
The discussion came before the council approved a mixed-use development which includes luxury apartments and a retail sector. The developer has proposed a swimming pool and club house which owners of an adjacent development protested as too close to their properties.
Council members voted 7-0 to approve the project which is located on the Northwest corner of Santa Fe Street and Waverly Rd. It will consist of luxury apartments and a high end retail sector that will include restaurants and shops.
At the planning commission meeting, citing noise and increased population, residents said building apartments in the neighborhood risked lowering their property values and would force the school district to bus students to Edgerton to accommodate the surge in student population. They also cited increased traffic volume and proposed off street parking in the new development.
The developer, Gregory DiVilbiss, countered that his company had gone to great lengths to ensure that the development was of high quality and that the placement of the pool and club would not negatively affect the neighborhood.
The planning commission had voted 5-2 to advance the development. Albert Rukwaro
Special To The Gardner News
Gardner city council members said they were unhappy with the way several planning commission members conducted themselves during a recent public hearing on a proposed mix-use development.
Council members said during a March 18 council meeting that some commissioners were not courteous and civil to homeowners who appeared before the commission to protest the placement of a pool and clubhouse near their townhomes.
“I suggest that the planning commission receive training on etiquette and civility,” said Randy Gregorcyck, councilmember. “We missed the opportunity at the planning commission level , and I urge the mayor to work with staff and the commission on training.”
Rich Melton, council vice president, said he supports calls for more training for planning commissioners “because there are folks over there who don’t know their role.”
Lee Moore, council president, said he did not like the behavior of some of the commissioners. “There is no reason to treat a member of public in that way.”
Moore ,however ,commended staff members who he said did a phenomenal job through that ordeal.
The discussion came before the council approved a mixed-use development which includes luxury apartments and a retail sector. The developer has proposed a swimming pool and club house which owners of an adjacent development protested as too close to their properties.
Council members voted 7-0 to approve the project which is located on the Northwest corner of Santa Fe Street and Waverly Rd. It will consist of luxury apartments and a high end retail sector that will include restaurants and shops.
At the planning commission meeting, citing noise and increased population, residents said building apartments in the neighborhood risked lowering their property values and would force the school district to bus students to Edgerton to accommodate the surge in student population. They also cited increased traffic volume and proposed off street parking in the new development.
The developer, Gregory DiVilbiss, countered that his company had gone to great lengths to ensure that the development was of high quality and that the placement of the pool and club would not negatively affect the neighborhood.
The planning commission had voted 5-2 to advance the development.