Court collections have increased about 14 percent a month since 2015 from $35,300 to $40,500, and Gardner currently has 1,397 outstanding warrants.
Although some communities have a “clean slate day” which allows people with unpaid fines to come to court, make payment arrangements and get the warrant released, Gardner has yet to provide a similar service.
However, citizens who voluntarily appear in court may have the warrant lifted.
“It has been discussed but no plans of a warrant ‘clean slate day’ have been made at this time,” said Daneeka Marshall-Oquendo, public affairs.
However, the Gardner Municipal Court does work with people on paying fees and fines, Marshall-Oquendo said. “The judge can issue payment plans or additional time to pay, on a case by case basis.”
“The best advice I can give is to contact the Municipal Court Department at 913-856-0904 to determine the status of the citation and the available options for resolution,” Marshall-Oquendo said.
In the event that the citation is in a warrant status, city staff advises the defendant voluntarily appear before the judge during a scheduled court docket to request the warrant be set aside and work with the courts to resolve the issue.
Appearing before the judge is not a guarantee that an arrest would not occur; however it is common that the warrant is set aside, Marshall-Oquendo said.
The municipal court schedule and additional information regarding citations can be found at www.gardnerkansas.gov.
Listings for some outstanding Gardner resident warrants can be viewed under warrant search at jocosheriff.org.
Warrants listed on the sheriff’s website are Johnson County warrants. To check on a Gardner Municipal Court warrant  go to www.gardnerkansas.gov/government/departments-and-divisions-/municipal-court/online-payments.
To check on a Gardner Municipal Court citation to determine if there is an outstanding fine go to www.gardnerkansas.gov/government/departments-and-divisions-/municipal-court/online-payments.
The lists are periodically purged or checked for accuracy, Marshall-Oquendo said.