Danedri Thompson
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Edgerton city council members approved an agreement between the city and the Lawrence Humane Society (LHS) on April 23. Under the terms of the agreement, the city of Edgerton would pay LHS $40 per animal transferred to the humane society.
Charlie Lydon, animal control and code enforcement officer, said there are no additional fees. Without the agreement, Edgerton could still take animals to LHS, but the animals would be placed on a waiting list and transfers would only be approved if space was available. That meant pets were sitting in a kennel in Edgerton, or worse, being euthanized.
It costs the city of Edgerton between $100 and $150 to euthanize an animal.
“(LHS) does everything they can to make sure these pets are taken care of and adopted out to other families,” Lydon told members of the council.
When the city transfers an animal to LHS, Edgerton also transfers ownership and rights to the animal. LHS will vaccinate, microchip, and spay and neuter animals as needed. The humane society also conducts temperament tests to ensure the animal is safe for adoption.
Lydon said Edgerton picks up between 100 and 120 roaming dogs and cats per year. Of those, a majority are picked up by their owners.
“We have a high redemption rate,” Lydon said.
Approximately 15 to 20 animals are transferred to other facilities.
Lydon said the city primarily transfers dogs, and that LHS will not take feral cats.
“My understanding is that the adoption rate is about one cat per five dogs,” Lydon said. “We get a lot more complaints on dogs.”
Still, there are alternatives for some cats. Lydon said he works with some farmers or those seeking barn cats.
City staff considered agreements with places other than LHS, but most didn’t have set prices for transfer fees.
During the April 23 council meeting, Lydon also briefed the governing body on recent spay and neuter events sponsored by the city.
In April 2014, the spay and neuter clinic assisted in 24 pets, and more than 50 percent of participants opted to microchip their pets. The majority also vaccinated their pets for rabies and distemper.
Lydon said the city succeed on building on the success of the 2014 clinic. During the 2015 event, on March 28, 178 cats and dogs received rabies vaccinations. More than 100 cats and dogs received low-cost distemper vaccinations and 21 pets received microchip implants.
“City staff will work diligently to further improve the event for next year and the years to come,” Lydon’s report to council read.

City clerk Janeice Rawles, center, swears into office Edgerton City Council member Clay Longanecker. Longanecker was re-elected to a four-year term on April 7. Mayor Don Roberts looks on. Rawles also swore into office Jody Brown. Newly-elected member Darius Crist did not attend the April 23 meeting. Crist was attending his daughter’s college graduation. Staff photo by Danedri Thompson

City clerk Janeice Rawles, center, swears into office Edgerton City Council member Clay Longanecker. Longanecker was re-elected to a four-year term on April 7. Mayor Don Roberts looks on. Rawles also swore into office Jody Brown. Newly-elected member Darius Crist did not attend the April 23 meeting. Crist was attending his daughter’s college graduation. Staff photo by Danedri Thompson


In other business, city council members:
• revised the Edgerton’s vehicle and equipment replacement schedule.
• approved $21,665 for the purchase of an outdoor tornado warning signal. The signal will be placed on city-owned land at the Homestead Lane Lift Station.
• approved $16,530 for the purchase of a vibratory roller. The roller will be assist public works staff in the maintaining city streets.
• approved several things related to upgrading Waverly Road, including annexation of property and the funding of relocating gas and water lines related to the road project.
• swore in re-elected council members Jody Brown and Clay Longanecker. Newly-elected council member Darius Crist did not attend the meeting as he was attending his daughter’s graduation from college.