It’s often said that you need to dance with the one who brought you. That often is good advice in business dealings.
Growing communities tend to bring in a lot of outsiders claiming to be their friends, holding in one hand pamphlets of promises while holding out their other hand for financial gain that often come from economic growth.
Gardner, Spring Hill, and Edgerton fit the economic mold that draws many of the kinds of companies seeking advertising dollars. They bill themselves as being “hometown” businesses, often spouting claims that are, at best, difficult to prove and often false.


But these businesses are anything but “hometown.”
They are businesses based in another community where sales taxes go to the larger community’s schools and city governments, helping to improve and build larger community’s roads, sidewalks, and parks.
They often are businesses owned by larger out-of-state corporations, which is where the profits go instead of back into the “hometown” communities.
Being “hometown” is when you can see and talk to the business owner or its employees on the street, or at the local grocery store, or at the local restaurant. Being “hometown” is having been part of the community from the beginning. It is knowing and understanding the history of the community, and wanting to help make it better in the future. It is helping to give back to the community. It is having a voice within the community and not saying what the community wants to hear simply to get its advertising dollars, but a voice that creates debate and dialogue to help move the community forward.
To be “hometown” means being there to serve the community everyday, 24 hours a day.
As Gardner, Spring Hill, and Edgerton continue to grow, businesses and residents need to be wary of outside interests claiming to be their “hometown” friends who do little but hold out their hands for money and, instead, dance with the one that’s the true hometown business.
We’re proud to have been a member of this community for more than 100 years. We love calling these communities home.