Graphic by Danedri Thompson

Danedri Thompson
[email protected]
A three-person mayoral race likely favors Mayor Dave Drovetta, but in a two-man race between Chris Morrow and Drovetta, it could be a very close race.
That’s the word from a Dec.6 -7 poll of likely Gardner voters. The poll was conducted by a political action committee, Kansans for State and Local Reform.
The survey revealed that 28 percent of likely voters would cast ballots for  Drovetta while 25 percent would cast ballots for council member Chris Morrow in a two-way race. The results are well within the margin of error of 8.9 percent. More than 45 percent of those polled were undecided in the race.

Graphic by Danedri Thompson

In a three-way race between Drovetta, Morrow and council member Kristina Harrison, Drovetta would win 24 percent of the votes; Morrow would receive 19 percent and Harrison would receive 14 percent of the ballots according to the survey. Nearly 45 percent of likely voters are undecided in a race between the three.
To date, only Morrow has announced his intention to run for the mayoral seat in Gardner.
Harrison said in an email to the Gardner News that she has no plans to run for Mayor.
Both Morrow and Drovetta can find positive things to take away from the poll, Benjamin Hodge, chairman of Kansans for State and Local Reform, said.
More than 94 percent of those polled recognize the name “Dave Drovetta” and 42 percent view him favorably, with 34 percent viewing him unfavorably.
From Survey, page 1
Morrow is also well known, but less polarizing than Drovetta, according to the poll. More than 42 percent of those polled view Morrow favorably while only 8 percent view him unfavorably.
The poll also asked voters their thoughts on local taxes.
Of likely Gardner voters polled, 70 percent believe property taxes are too high.
Noon on Jan. 22 is the deadline to file to run for the office. If there are more than four candidates, the primary election will be Feb. 26. The general election is April 2.
Kansans for State and Local Reform was formed in 2009 and focuses mainly on issues like taxes, property rights, school choice and open government. Its website is www.KansasReform.com.