November 26, 2014

Shame on those who dump unwanted pets

Joan Taylor
Edgerton
Shame on you, yes shame on you!  It is that time of year, people are getting outdoors, and spring is here.
It is also that time of year when people have a tendency to dump pets.
I know you tell yourself that you are re-homing them.  You are setting them free.  By opening that car door or just setting them out on your front sidewalk they are getting their chance at freedom.
Well let’s do a little reality check.  First if you have driven to a remote spot or a nearby town, this is dumping.  You are putting a pet that has been fed and protected, out for slaughter.
I can tell you there is no sweet little old lady ready to take on your extra animals.  What they will face are raccoons, possums, dogs, foxes and mostly other cats.  They won’t know how to hunt or compete for food.
Feeling better about that decision yet?  They will go hungry or in desperation eat poisoned food.  We had two such pets show up this past week.  Beautiful, long haired, yellow and white boy cats.  Neutered, taken care of, house pets.
I can’t afford to feed them.  They will remain outside on their own because no-kill shelters don’t take dumped pets as a rule.  They do, however, take pets that have been turned over by their owners.  So these boys will stay outside, fending for themselves until the at-large dogs or coyotes get them or they get hit by a car.
Wait, you miss them?  Heading off to find a nice cute kitten or puppy to take their place?  Well once again, shame on you.

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