November 24, 2014

Rail zones aren’t quiet, but Edgerton will pay

Construction for a quiet zone at the at-grade rail crossings at 199th Street and at Nelson Street in Edgerton are complete. However, the upgrades do not meet federal safety standards and trains continue to blow their horns at the crossings in Edgerton. Staff photo by Danedri Thompson

Construction for a quiet zone at the at-grade rail crossings at 199th Street and at Nelson Street in Edgerton are complete. However, the upgrades do not meet federal safety standards and trains continue to blow their horns at the crossings in Edgerton. Staff photo by Danedri Thompson

Danedri Thompson
dthompson@gardnernews.com
Edgerton will pay final bills for a project to create a quiet zone at the railroad crossing at Nelson Street, despite the finished product’s failure to meet federal guidelines for a quiet zone.
Construction on the project was completed earlier this year, city administrator Beth Linn told Edgerton City Council members during a Aug. 14 meeting.
The Federal Railroad Administration notified the city of Edgerton in June that the safety measures installed along 199th Street and Nelson Street do not meet federal requirements for the establishment of a quiet zone.
City staff have removed “No Train Horn” signs at the Nelson Street at-grade crossing.
“The contractor’s responsibility is only to building what’s in the plan,” Linn said.
The city contracted with Olsson Associates to draft plans for the quiet zone. Design plans for the project were completed in 2011. The city hired a construction contractor on the project in October 2013. The contractor was only responsible for building what was in the plan.
“The city has some work to do with the design firm,” Linn said.
Making the final payment on the work will allow a warranty period to begin.
Linn said city officials are working with their design partners on what modifications will be needed at the railroad crossings to meet federal quiet zone regulations.
She hopes modifications can be completed by the end of the year, but she said she can’t specify a time frame until she knows the extent of necessary modifications.
“We are hoping to have the modification plan back from the engineer within in the next 10 days,” she said. “That would help us know the magnitude of modifications that need to be made, but it’s difficult to say how long that construction piece would take.”

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