Joan Dorsey
Contributing columnist
So fall brings us all those colorful things. It also reminds the kids and me about politics.
We were the family of a local politician. Very small town. It was eight plus years of life training for the kids. Not counting city council and various other committees.
The kids learned to answer the phone and take messages. They knew not to give out information only to take messages. These were the days before an answering machine. They were rock stars.
Small town politics is different than those of the towns today. I don’t remember our politician ever having a fund raiser or soliciting for campaign funds. He used his money from the job he worked at to fund his campaign. There were no yard signs or political advertisements. Possibly some fliers passed out by the kid’s door-to- door. He met people face to face, eye to eye and shook hands. Spoke to them, asked their names and tried to remember all of them.
I attended a fund raiser a few years back as a sort of social eye opener. I didn’t realize this is where people pull out their checkbooks and throw checks into a basket for the person they wish to win. Makes me think of a horse race and people betting on the winner.
At the fundraiser, this particular candidate didn’t take the time to introduce himself to me. Nor did he look me in the eye and even make small talk. Needless to say I didn’t and still don’t vote for him.
There was a local owner of a business that stayed open till early
hours of the morning. Not many businesses in our town, so every owner
was important. He would call at 2:30 a.m. Thank goodness for the phone
machine. But when you have aging parents every ring of the phone is a
take-notice event.
This man would call and express his unhappiness about city things or police or whatever he had heard from the bar patrons that evening. All duly noted. The mayor would take note, check with the police or city hall about these problems and return the call to this man. He would call him back at 10 or 11 a.m. Normal business hours.
It didn’t take many return call for the business owner to figure a call in the afternoon would be beneficial for every one’s sleep.
I can’t think of any actual perks my kids got from their dad being mayor. One of the men who held office before their dad had a passel of kids. Every holiday or city event when a name was drawn, it seemed it was the same name as the mayor.
The rule in our house was the kids could enter the contests, but they were not to win, and they didn’t.
Life is what it is. I don’t think they were deprived in any way. Life being what it is for a young family, I remember sending my daughter into city hall with the water bill on the due date. She was gone several minutes and came back out in tears. Upon investigation I discovered the lady who was filling in at city hall, had informed my daughter, “The mayor shouldn’t pay his bills on the due date, but before.” So I guess we were held to a higher standard than a number of other residents.
Dennis Moore, former district attorney, once visited our old office out on Santa Fe St. He leaned in through my window, shook my hand, looked me in the eye and asked my name. He asked how long I had worked for the paper and where I was from. He was honest, interested and very personable.
So although only a couple of the candidates will read this. Here are some words for you.
1. Introduce yourself. “Hello I am Joe Blow.”
2. Be friendly MAKE EYE CONTACT.
3. Give your name and ask their name. Ask a generic personal question. “Have you lived here long?”
4. Engage this person for a short time. Their vote could very possible influence a larger number of others than you ever imagined. We don’t all look alike, try to remember us.
I am only one voter. I have been on the other side of the ballot as a
family member.
I hold you to high standards, much like the ones I was held to.
You earn a vote; you don’t get it by default.Joan Dorsey
Contributing columnist
So fall brings us all those colorful things. It also reminds the kids and me about politics.
We were the family of a local politician. Very small town. It was eight plus years of life training for the kids. Not counting city council and various other committees.
The kids learned to answer the phone and take messages. They knew not to give out information only to take messages. These were the days before an answering machine. They were rock stars.
Small town politics is different than those of the towns today. I don’t remember our politician ever having a fund raiser or soliciting for campaign funds. He used his money from the job he worked at to fund his campaign. There were no yard signs or political advertisements. Possibly some fliers passed out by the kid’s door-to- door. He met people face to face, eye to eye and shook hands. Spoke to them, asked their names and tried to remember all of them.
I attended a fund raiser a few years back as a sort of social eye opener. I didn’t realize this is where people pull out their checkbooks and throw checks into a basket for the person they wish to win. Makes me think of a horse race and people betting on the winner.
At the fundraiser, this particular candidate didn’t take the time to introduce himself to me. Nor did he look me in the eye and even make small talk. Needless to say I didn’t and still don’t vote for him.
There was a local owner of a business that stayed open till early
hours of the morning. Not many businesses in our town, so every owner
was important. He would call at 2:30 a.m. Thank goodness for the phone
machine. But when you have aging parents every ring of the phone is a
take-notice event.
This man would call and express his unhappiness about city things or police or whatever he had heard from the bar patrons that evening. All duly noted. The mayor would take note, check with the police or city hall about these problems and return the call to this man. He would call him back at 10 or 11 a.m. Normal business hours.
It didn’t take many return call for the business owner to figure a call in the afternoon would be beneficial for every one’s sleep.
I can’t think of any actual perks my kids got from their dad being mayor. One of the men who held office before their dad had a passel of kids. Every holiday or city event when a name was drawn, it seemed it was the same name as the mayor.
The rule in our house was the kids could enter the contests, but they were not to win, and they didn’t.
Life is what it is. I don’t think they were deprived in any way. Life being what it is for a young family, I remember sending my daughter into city hall with the water bill on the due date. She was gone several minutes and came back out in tears. Upon investigation I discovered the lady who was filling in at city hall, had informed my daughter, “The mayor shouldn’t pay his bills on the due date, but before.” So I guess we were held to a higher standard than a number of other residents.
Dennis Moore, former district attorney, once visited our old office out on Santa Fe St. He leaned in through my window, shook my hand, looked me in the eye and asked my name. He asked how long I had worked for the paper and where I was from. He was honest, interested and very personable.
So although only a couple of the candidates will read this. Here are some words for you.
1. Introduce yourself. “Hello I am Joe Blow.”
2. Be friendly MAKE EYE CONTACT.
3. Give your name and ask their name. Ask a generic personal question. “Have you lived here long?”
4. Engage this person for a short time. Their vote could very possible influence a larger number of others than you ever imagined. We don’t all look alike, try to remember us.
I am only one voter. I have been on the other side of the ballot as a
family member.
I hold you to high standards, much like the ones I was held to.
You earn a vote; you don’t get it by default.