Author: Gardner News

Learning to love who we love; trauma leads to sexual repression

Jill Richardson Guest Columnist Two weeks ago, the equivalent of a bomb exploded in my life. I’ve had personal problems of various sorts for 30 years, and daily migraines for 22 of them. Three years ago, I finally realized my symptoms were those of trauma. I didn’t know what happened to me, but clearly something had. I began therapy for trauma, and it’s been gradually helping. Then, out of the blue, two weeks ago I realized what the original trauma was. When I was six, I had just learned about female anatomy, and I was saying my new favorite word over and over. A lot of kids go through a similar phase, and the parent’s job is to teach the child what’s appropriate — and what’s not. Whatever was said to me instead was so shaming I experienced it as a trauma. Once I realized this, I began to put the puzzle pieces together about my own life. I basically shut down my entire sexuality when the trauma occurred. Now it’s starting to come back. I’ve always assumed I was straight — but am I? Honestly, I don’t know. My hunch, however, is that I am not. I think I am probably bisexual. I just didn’t realize it till now. Once upon a time, we had no concept of being “straight,” “gay,” or “bisexual.” There weren’t sexual identities, just...

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Johnson County Extension providing assistance during Medicare open enrollment

Fall Medicare open enrollment is here, and Johnson County K-State Research and Extension is offering personalized assistance to Johnson County residents through plan comparisons. This service is available throughout the enrollment period that runs from Oct. 15 through Dec. 7. Residents can contact the Johnson County Extension office at 913-715-7000 or email Denise Dias, Family and Consumer Sciences agent at [email protected] to receive a Medicare Prescription Drug Worksheet. Completed worksheets should be returned to Dias. Residents will then receive a comparison of the top three plans with an explanation and instructions. There will be two Medicare open enrollment events in Johnson County. The first is November 6 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Kansas State University Olathe campus, 22201 W. Innovation Drive, in Olathe. Medicare officials from Washington D.C. will be at this event to observe the enrollment process, due to the success of Kansas’ Medicare program. The second event is hosted by Johnson County Extension, November 9 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Sunset Drive Office Building, 11811 S. Sunset Drive, in Olathe. Appointments for both events are recommended and may be scheduled by calling the Extension office at 913-715-7000. It is recommended that most people enroll in Medicare when they turn 65, even if they have health insurance from an employer. There are only certain times of the year when people can enroll....

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Veterans’ appreciation programs planned

Four Vietnam veterans were at the Gardner Historical Museum’s Vietnam Veterans Tribute on the opening day of the exhibit. Top row is Lane Smith, Overland Park. Front row from left is Jack Hiles, Overland Park, Mike Rivera, Gardner, and Tom Mader, Edgerton. The exhibit runs into November. Photo courtesy of Charlie Troutner Gardner hosts vterans Appreciation Program Gardner is hosting the city’s second annual Veterans Appreciation Program to honor and celebrate our local service members for their dedication and service. The event will be held on Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, 6 p.m., at Gardner City Hall Council Chambers. Please...

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UAC considers USD 231 electric rate classification

In a special meeting on Thursday, October 12, the Utility Advisory Commission considered whether or not USD 231 should continue to have a distinct classification in the city’s electric rate schedule. Staff photo by Rick Poppitz Rick Poppitz Special to The Gardner News The only item on the agenda at the special meeting of the Utility Advisory Commission (UAC) on Oct. 12 was consideration of the USD 231 school district electric rate classification. The question before commission was not to consider the rate itself, but whether to recommend to council that the school continues to have a distinct classification...

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Eisenhower Vigil

Members of the Gardner Post 11234 were at the Eisenhower Vigil in Abilene, on Oct. 13. Attending were: L-R members; Mike Hutton, Joe Scheuenman, Dean Bonawitz, Mike Ficken, Gaylen Talyor, Ron Burger, Bruce McNeel, Tim Berger and Hank Deters. Submitted photo...

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Council considers bonds for warehouse facility; I-35 interchange

Local scouts visited city hall on and led the Pledge of Allegiance from the dais at the Oct 16 city council meeting. Staff photo by Rick Poppitz Rick Poppitz Special to The Gardner News Gardner council met on Oct.16 and considered Industrial Revenue Bond issuance for construction and costs of a commercial facility, General Obligation Bonds for various road improvement projects, the USD 231 electric rate classification and a contract franchise for a telecommunication system provider. USD 231 electric rate classification Council considered recommendation from the Utility Advisory Committee to keep the school district in a distinct classification in...

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Trailblazer soccer records third straight shutout, attain 7-0 record

Pete Logan Special to The Gardner News About 60 percent of the way through a whirlwind string of five games in nine days, the Gardner-Edgerton High School boys’ soccer team has to be pleased with their progress. After Monday night’s 7-0 dismantling of Lansing at the Gardner-District Activities Complex, the Trailblazers are 3-0 on the five-game stretch with all three wins coming by shutout. The Monday night victory over the Lions followed a 2-0 Trailblazer home decision over Olathe West on October 3rd and a 1-0 Blazer home win against Shawnee Mission North on October 5th. “My college coach always talked about how winning is contagious,” said GEHS head coach Erik Jones after his team’s defeat of Lansing Monday night. “It’s been a fun process. The last few games have been fun to see us starting to click a little bit.” The Trailblazers certainly clicked together Monday evening, scoring five goals before the halftime break and taking home a 7-0 win in a contest that was called with 8:38 left to play due to lightning concerns. Junior midfielder Marshall Hammett led the way for the Blazers against the lions, racking up a hat trick of goals in less than nine minutes of the first half. After senior striker Rees Taylor opened the scoring by collecting a pass that had slipped through the Lansing box and putting in the back...

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Huskies end season with victory over Jags

The 8th grade Husky Football Teams ended the season with a big win over the Jaguars. The offense proved to have a powerful running game behind the blocking of Blake Moore, Gavin Klaassen, Caden Johnson, John Ashens and Justice Burton. Their efforts up front put Zach Collins into the end zone twice.  Keeghan Troutman added a TD pass to Will Shular.  Lucas Anderson added big key gains in the running game also. The Husky defense played great last night against cross town rival Pioneer Ridge Jaguars. They were able to hold the Jaguar offense at bay for most of the game including a big “three and out” to start off the game and give the Huskies some momentum.  The leading tacklers were Zach Collins, Kaeden Crowell, and Justice Burton. John Ashens played very well clogging up the middle all game. Final Score – Huskies win 26-20 ending their great season with 5 wins and only 2 close losses.  ...

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Politics; professionalism; tips from someone inside a political family

Joan Dorsey Contributing columnist So fall brings us all those colorful things. It also reminds the kids and me about politics. We were the family of a local politician. Very small town. It was eight plus years of life training for the kids. Not counting city council and various other committees. The kids learned to answer the phone and take messages. They knew not to give out information only to take messages. These were the days before an answering machine. They were rock stars. Small town politics is different than those of the towns today. I don’t remember our politician ever having a fund raiser or soliciting for campaign funds. He used his money from the job he worked at to fund his campaign. There were no yard signs or political advertisements. Possibly some fliers passed out by the kid’s door-to- door. He met people face to face, eye to eye and shook hands. Spoke to them, asked their names and tried to remember all of them. I attended a fund raiser a few years back as a sort of social eye opener. I didn’t realize this is where people pull out their checkbooks and throw checks into a basket for the person they wish to win. Makes me think of a horse race and people betting on the winner. At the fundraiser, this particular candidate didn’t take the time...

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What happened to Trump’s pledge to close this billionaire loophole?

Jim Hightower Guest Columnist These are hard times for America’s gold miners. They’re scrambling to get ahead, but seeing their pay dropping. Take Bob Mercer, who’s been a top miner for years, but last year even Bob was down. He pulled in only $125 million in pay. Can you feel Bob’s pain? Well, these aren’t your normal miners. They’re hedge fund managers, digging for gold in Wall Street. Indeed, if you divided Mercer’s pay in his “bad year” among 1,000 real miners doing honest work, each would consider it a fabulous year. Nonetheless, hedge funds are almost literally gold mines, although they require no heavy lifting by the soft-handed, Gucci-wearing managers who work them. These gold diggers are basically nothing but speculators, drawing billions of dollars from the über-rich by promising that they’ll deliver fabulous profits. But the scam is that Mercer and his fellow diggers get paid whether they deliver or not. Their cushy set up, known as 2 and 20, works like this. Right off the top, they take 2 percent of the money put up by each wealthy client, which hedge fund whizzes like Mercer keep even if the investments they make are losers. Then, if their speculative bets do pay off, they pocket 20 percent of all profits. Finally, hedge fund lobbyists have rigged our nation’s tax code so these Wall Street miners pay a...

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City of Gardner accepting applications for boards, commissions

Gardner is accepting applications for the following boards and commissions: Planning Commission – 2 positions The Planning Commission is a citizen body that reviews development proposals for compliance with the city’s adopted plans and development policies, receives reports from city staff, conducts public hearings, and makes recommendations to the City Council. Airport Advisory Board – 1 position The Airport Advisory Board advises the City Council on matters pertaining to continued growth and improvement of the airport, including the acquisition of property, construction and reconstruction of airport facilities, and the institution of programs and procedures which will increase usage of...

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Sports Potpourri

Mac Stevenson The Kansas City Chiefs put the finishing touches on what was a forgettable weekend for football fans in the state of Kansas, losing 19-13 to the Pittsburgh Steelers. KC has played a number of great games under the coaching of Andy Reid, but last Sunday wasn’t one of them. Pittsburgh dominated KC at the line of scrimmage on offense and defense; it’s a wonder the score wasn’t much worse than it was. But that’s the way it goes in the NFL—when teams don’t play their best football, they walk off the field losers. KC will have to quickly forget the Pittsburgh game and focus on their Thursday night game at Oakland (CBS TV). The Chiefs had many shortcomings last Sunday, but the worst of all was the inept tackling by the defense. Kansas City will be, at worst, tied for first in the AFC West going into the Thursday night game. KC has played well against Oakland recently and the guess here is that the Chiefs will be ready to go Thursday. From here on, the main thing for KC is being able to avoid any more serious injuries; that can decimate a team in a hurry. Delusions of grandeur vanished as quickly as a late evening sunset for Kansas State’s football team following the 26-6 loss to unbeaten Texas Christian. Dreams of a high national ranking...

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Blue Valley West Jaguars defeat Trailblazers with 31-26 victory

Pete Logan Special to The Gardner News Improvisation — in the form of fleet-footed Blue Valley West senior quarterback Keaton Goodale — proved to be the Gardner-Edgerton High School football team’s biggest nemesis Friday night, as the Trail Blazers fell, 31-26, to the Jaguars at the Blue Valley District Athletic Complex. Goodale rushed for three touchdowns for West, including the eventual game-decider, and kept several more plays alive with his scrambling ability. Even more frustrating for the Blazer defense, several of Goodale’s gains came about after being flushed out of the pocket by the GEHS defense. The West quarterback’s efforts overshadowed another strong offensive showing by the Trail Blazers who rushed for 312 yards and four touchdowns on the night and gained 102 more yards through the air. The Blazers opened the game in commanding fashion, marching the ball 80 yards in 9 plays and punctuation their drive with a one-yard TD plunge by sophomore quarterback Tyler Goetzman. The early scoring campaign gave Gardner-Edgerton a 7-0 lead 3 ½ minutes into the game. The Jaguars answered with a scoring drive of their own, but had to settle for a 43-yard field goal after Trail Blazer senior linebacker Tucker Tribble sacked Goodale on a 3rd-and-11 at the GEHS 22-yard line. After West senior kicker John Wills converted the boot, the score was 7-3 Blazers with 4:06 remaining in the first...

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Two of four city council candidates attend final VFW forum, field questions

Rick Poppitz Special to The Gardner News Gardner VFW Post 11234 held the last of a series of three public forums for city council candidates on Sun, Oct. 15 at the Grange building on the fairgrounds. Michael Blanchard and Randy Gregorcyk, two of the four candidates, participated in the forum. Mark Baldwin and Scott Smith declined the invitation to attend. Candidates were given the opportunity for opening and closing remarks, and in between, responded to questions from the audience. Video of the complete forum can be viewed on gardnernews.com. First, candidates were asked about the recent issue with youth sports programs and what could be expected in the future. Blanchard – “The issue between the city and the school board is one where, you know, I shared the information that I looked up and requested, and I asked one of our elected officials when he told me that I was missing information, for that information and he refused to provide it. Which leads me to believe that I’ve collected the information I need. It doesn’t look like, in my opinion, the two programs or the city and the BOE even tried to work together to prevent this situation happening. […] it’s going to get really interesting come spring when baseball season kicks in.” Gregorcyk – “Going door-to-door I actually knocked on quite a bit of schoolteachers doors and their...

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School Board hears about flexible seating; turf upgrades

(left) Stephanie Green, para educator at Nike Middle School and Bruce Haber, principal. (right) Barb McCormick, Gardner Edgerton High School Arts Teacher and Mark Meyer, principal. Green and McCormick were presented with First Quarter Shining Star Awards at the Oct. 9 USD 231 Board of Education meeting. Staff photo by Rick Poppitz Rick Poppitz Special to The Gardner News The USD 231 Board of Education meeting on October 10 began with the Pledge of Allegiance led by students from Gardner Elementary. The school board heard a presentation on flexible seating in classrooms, discussed upgrading turf on ball fields and heard two members of the public express concerns with a New Century construction project. Flexible seating in classrooms The board and attendees heard a presentation on ‘flexible seating,’ an alternative to the traditional classroom seating arrangement of rows of desks. Jason Watkins, principal at Gardner Elementary, offered some background on flexible seating in GE. He said a teacher had discussed research on flexible seating with him and wanted to try it. “One tried it, then another, and now it’s gone through our building,” he said. Watkins then introduced teachers Kelly Newman and Brittney Rinehart, who brought some of the seats to display and gave the presentation on flexible seating. Each student can choose the type of seat they prefer – from rockers, beanbag seats, soft floor cushions, stability balls and...

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Trump wants $1.6 Billion for the border wall. That covers just 74 miles

Jim Hightower Guest Columnist All this for a boondoggle project most Americans continue to oppose. How much of your money does Donald Trump want to pour into his xenophobic fantasy of erecting an impenetrable wall on our Mexican border? The big-businessman-turned-president insists he doesn’t care about costs — just build it! That seems to be a very un-business like approach, but then, it’s not his money, is it? For those of you who do care, one measure of what the total tab might be is that he’s demanding $1.6 billion from Congress to start construction. How much wall will that buy? Seventy-four miles. Now, how long is that U.S.-Mexican border he wants to seal off? One thousand, nine-hundred miles long. So, $1.6 billion down — and only 1,826 miles to go. And let’s not even get into the cost overruns, fraudulent billings, shoddy materials, and other scams that the army of corporate contractors will add to the sticker price of Donald’s boondoggle on the border. All of this for a 1,900-mile divider of both physical and symbolic ugliness that only an extremist minority of Americans support. Besides being wildly expensive, this Trumpian folly isn’t needed and won’t work. It stifles the border economy, tramples on property rights, destroys sensitive environments, and autocratically separates millions of families and communities. It’s an insult not only to the people of Mexico, but...

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AG Derek Schmidt announces KOMA settlement with Jo Co Parks

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt today announced a settlement with the chairman of the Johnson County Park and Recreation District Board to resolve a violation of the Kansas Open Meetings Act (KOMA). The settlement was finalized last week. In December 2016, the attorney general’s office received a complaint alleging that the chairman violated the KOMA. The complaint alleged that the chairman engaged in serial communications in violation of the KOMA by individually contacting a majority of the members of the board seeking support for a second term as chairman. Upon investigation, the attorney general’s office determined that the interactive communications in a series did violate the KOMA. At the conclusion of the investigation, the chairman signed a consent order agreeing to receive at least one hour of training on the provisions of the KOMA and not to engage in any future violations of the KOMA. A copy of the Consent Order is available at http://ag.ks.gov/open-govt/enforcement-actions. Information about requirements of the Kansas Open Meetings Act and the Kansas Open Records Act can be found at http://ag.ks.gov/open-govt....

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Church, Scooters and Royal’s banner top PC

Rick Poppitz Special to The Gardner News Gardner Planning Commission met on Sept. 26 to consider the site plan for a new Scooter’s Coffee drive through and site plan for expansion of an existing church. The commission also considered initiating staff research into review and reassessment of city code pertaining to sign codes. Scooter’s Coffee The commission considered the site plan and request for administrative adjustments for a new Scooter’s Coffee drive through kiosk in the location where the vacated Waffle House is now. Michelle Kriks, planner, presented the staff review and recommendation. The lot is part of the Gardner Truck Plaza plat and is currently owned by Waffle House Corporation. They are currently under contract to sell the property to an investment group, MB-CFC Gardner, LLC, which is planning to lease the property to Scooter’s Coffee. An example of the adjustments requested (exception to code) is code that requires a storefront to be 50 to 80 percent windows – “transparency,” so the public can see the public area inside. This building is only 466 square feet, and that would make it almost all windows and interfere with the intended operation. It is intended as drive a through only, and there is no interior customer area. Due to the small size of this building and drive through only operation, staff agreed these standards were not practical in this case...

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Fire District 1

Submitted photo Due to increased demand for services, Fire District 1 has recently implemented a fee structure for services provided to industrial facilities, for inspections and other non-emergency services. The number of emergency calls has also been increasing at a steady pace over recent years. In 2014, FD1 ran 2,200 total calls. In 2015, they had 2,322 runs and in 2016 that increased to 2,534. Response times for calls to Gardner, Edgerton and New Century, where stations are located, are all under 4 minutes. Response to rural county areas was 6+ minutes. Response time is measured from the time...

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